Vale uses battery storage at ore terminal

Brazil based miner Vale has installed a battery energy storage system at the Ilha Guaíba iron ore port in Rio de Janeiro.
Vale uses battery storage at ore terminal Vale uses battery storage at ore terminal Vale uses battery storage at ore terminal Vale uses battery storage at ore terminal Vale uses battery storage at ore terminal

The system can store enough energy to power 45,000 homes for one hour

The BESS (Battery Energy Storage Systems) system, developed in partnership with Siemens and MicroPower Comerc (MPC), will reduce the electric energy cost of the port by almost 20%, noted the company.

The battery storage system, which will use lithium-ion batteries manufactured by Tesla, will replace electrical grid supply for the port during peak demand periods when the tariff is more expensive. It has a storage capacity of 10 MegawWatt-hours, which is enough energy to power 45,000 homes for one hour.

"As Vale continues to decarbonize its operations, the use of batteries will become an increasingly important part of the electrification of our fleet," explained Vale's Energy director, Ricardo Mendes.

The method of substituting the supply from the utility company when the demand is high is known as Peak Shaving, said Vale.

"This project allows us to test new technology in the field and accelerate Vale's energy transformation, which aims to achieve self-sufficiency by increasing electric power generation mainly through solar and wind sources in addition to our hydroelectric power generation," he added.

In July,  Vale revealed that it was developing an electric locomotive with Caterpillar's Progress Rail. The 100% electric, battery-powered switchyard EMD Joule locomotive is under construction at Progress Rail's industrial plant in Sete Lagoas in Minas Gerais state. Vale expects to start a pilot test in the second half of this year at its Tubarão unit, which comprises railway, pelletising and port operations.

The company plans to invest at least US$2 billion in reducing its direct and indirect absolute scope 1 and 2 emissions by 33% by 2030.