Nevada Vanadium, Hitachi to work on renewables

Nevada Vanadium has its eyes set on establishing a microgrid and battery energy storage system
Nevada Vanadium, Hitachi to work on renewables Nevada Vanadium, Hitachi to work on renewables Nevada Vanadium, Hitachi to work on renewables Nevada Vanadium, Hitachi to work on renewables Nevada Vanadium, Hitachi to work on renewables

Nevada Vanadium is aiming for a solar project on-site.

Nevada Vanadium will work with Hitachi Energy to develop renewable energy sources for the company's Gibellini mine in Nevada.

The companies will collaborate in determining the energy requirements of the mine, which will be powered 100% by renewable sources. Hitachi will work with M3 Engineering & Technology, which is focused on the mine design.

"We have selected Hitachi Energy as a partner for this project because of their deep understanding of the power requirements of large-scale industrial operations, their extensive experience with the mining industry and their proven expertise in the integration of variable, renewable energy sources into power grids," Nevada Vanadium chief executive Ron Espell said.

Hitachi, with M3, will determine maximum equipment demands for normal, emergency, and transient operations; supply power profiles; utility interconnection; and opportunities for emission reductions via electrification.

Nevada Vanadium has its eyes set on establishing a microgrid and battery energy storage system, powered by on-site solar energy.

Hitachi will also identify possible partnerships with local stakeholders to provide energy for rural communities near the mine.

Operations at Gibellini are expected to be in production by 2024. It would be the first primary vanadium operation in the U.S.